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Pediatr Obes. 2015 Feb;10(1):23-9. doi: 10.1111/j.2047-6310.2014.221.x. Epub 2014 Mar 27.

Breathprints of childhood obesity: changes in volatile organic compounds in obese children compared with lean controls.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA; Digestive Disease Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA; Center for Cardiovascular Diagnostics and Prevention, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to investigate changes in volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath in overweight/obese children compared with their lean counterparts.

STUDY DESIGN:

Single exhaled breath was collected and analyzed per protocol using selective ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS).

RESULTS:

Sixty overweight/obese children and 55 lean controls were included. Compared with the lean group, the obese group was significantly older (14.1 ± 2.8 vs. 12.1 ± 3.0 years), taller (164.8 ± 10.9 vs. 153.3 ± 17.1 cm) and more likely to be Caucasian (60% vs. 35.2%); P < 0.05 for all. A comparison of the SIFT-MS results of the obese group with the lean group revealed differences in concentration of more than 50 compounds. A panel of four VOCs can identify the presence of overweight/obesity with excellent accuracy. Further analysis revealed that breath isoprene, 1-decene, 1-octene, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide were significantly higher in the obese group compared with the lean group (P value < 0.01 for all).

CONCLUSION:

Obese children have a unique pattern of exhaled VOCs. Changes in VOCs observed in this study may help to gain insight into pathophysiological processes and pathways leading to the development of childhood obesity.

KEYWORDS:

Biomarker; breath testing; insulin resistance; oxidative stress

PMID:
24677760
PMCID:
PMC4177515
DOI:
10.1111/j.2047-6310.2014.221.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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