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Br J Cancer. 2014 Apr 29;110(9):2321-6. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2014.148. Epub 2014 Mar 27.

Organic food consumption and the incidence of cancer in a large prospective study of women in the United Kingdom.

Author information

1
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LF, UK.
2
Department of Primary Care and Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG, UK.
3
Worldwide Epidemiology, GSK, Uxbridge UB11 1BT, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Organically produced foods are less likely than conventionally produced foods to contain pesticide residues.

METHODS:

We examined the hypothesis that eating organic food may reduce the risk of soft tissue sarcoma, breast cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and other common cancers in a large prospective study of 623 080 middle-aged UK women. Women reported their consumption of organic food and were followed for cancer incidence over the next 9.3 years. Cox regression models were used to estimate adjusted relative risks for cancer incidence by the reported frequency of consumption of organic foods.

RESULTS:

At baseline, 30%, 63% and 7% of women reported never, sometimes, or usually/always eating organic food, respectively. Consumption of organic food was not associated with a reduction in the incidence of all cancer (n=53 769 cases in total) (RR for usually/always vs never=1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.99-1.07), soft tissue sarcoma (RR=1.37, 95% CI: 0.82-2.27), or breast cancer (RR=1.09, 95% CI: 1.02-1.15), but was associated for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (RR=0.79, 95% CI: 0.65-0.96).

CONCLUSIONS:

In this large prospective study there was little or no decrease in the incidence of cancer associated with consumption of organic food, except possibly for non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

PMID:
24675385
PMCID:
PMC4007233
DOI:
10.1038/bjc.2014.148
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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