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Am J Pharm Educ. 2014 Mar 12;78(2):34. doi: 10.5688/ajpe78234.

Impact of students pharmacists on the medication reconciliation process in high-risk hospitalized general medicine patients.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacy Practice, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts ; Lahey Hospital and Medical Center, Burlington, Massachusetts.
2
Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences University, Boston, Massachusetts ; Lahey Hospital and Medical Center, Burlington, Massachusetts.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE" To compare the accuracy of medication lists obtained by student pharmacists, nurses, and physicians, and quantify the number of discrepancies identified as part of the medication reconciliation process.

METHODS:

Between May and July 2012, patients admitted to an internal medicine team at a 350-bed tertiary academic medical center were assessed for inclusion in the study. Physicians and/or nurses conducted medication reviews for these patients at the time of admission, while student pharmacists conducted medication reconciliation.

RESULTS:

Eighty-six patients were assessed, and 52 met all inclusion criteria. A total of 268 discrepancies were identified as part of the medication reconciliation performed by the student pharmacists, approximating 5 discrepancies per patient (range 0-13). Student pharmacists identified 532 preadmission medications, significantly more than did nurses (355) or physicians (368), p=0.006.

CONCLUSION:

Student pharmacists, with appropriate oversight, can be used in several tasks that previously may have been designated to pharmacists only, such as medication reconciliation.

KEYWORDS:

medication reconciliation; pharmacy; student pharmacist

PMID:
24672067
PMCID:
PMC3965142
DOI:
10.5688/ajpe78234
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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