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Clin Cancer Res. 2014 Jul 1;20(13):3531-9. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-13-1826. Epub 2014 Mar 26.

In vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging for monitoring the efficacy of the cancer treatment.

Author information

1
Authors' Affiliations: NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda;
2
Authors' Affiliations: NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda; Division of Physics, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, CDRH, FDA, Silver Spring;
3
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland; and UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas.
4
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland; and.
5
Authors' Affiliations: NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda; amir@helix.nih.gov.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Advances in tumor biology created a foundation for targeted therapy aimed at inactivation of specific molecular mechanisms responsible for cell malignancy. In this paper, we used in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging with HER2-targeted fluorescent probes as an alternative imaging method to investigate the efficacy of targeted therapy with 17-DMAG (an HSP90 inhibitor) on tumors with high expression of HER2 receptors.

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN:

HER2-specific Affibody, conjugated to Alexafluor 750, was injected into nude mice bearing HER2-positive tumor xenograft. The fluorescence lifetime was measured before treatment and monitored after the probe injections at 12 hours after the last treatment dose, when the response to the 17-DMAG therapy was the most pronounced as well as a week after the last treatment when the tumors grew back almost to their pretreatment size.

RESULTS:

Imaging results showed significant difference between the fluorescence lifetimes at the tumor and the contralateral site (∼0.13 ns) in the control group (before treatment) and 7 days after the last treatment when the tumors grew back to their pretreatment dimensions. However, at the time frame that the treatment had its maximum effect (12 hours after the last treatment), the difference between the fluorescence lifetime at the tumor and contralateral site decreased to 0.03 ns.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results showed a good correlation between fluorescence lifetime and the efficacy of the treatment. These findings show that in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging can be used as a promising molecular imaging tool for monitoring the treatment outcome in preclinical models and potentially in patients.

PMID:
24671949
PMCID:
PMC4776631
DOI:
10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-13-1826
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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