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Nature. 2014 Apr 24;508(7497):531-5. doi: 10.1038/nature13073. Epub 2014 Mar 12.

Inhibition of miR-25 improves cardiac contractility in the failing heart.

Author information

1
1] Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, and the Muscle Development and Regeneration Program, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2].
2
1] The Cardiovascular Research Center, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York 10029, USA [2].
3
Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, and the Muscle Development and Regeneration Program, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.
4
The Cardiovascular Research Center, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York 10029, USA.
5
1] Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, and the Muscle Development and Regeneration Program, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Department of Cardiology, University Medical Center Utrecht and ICIN Netherlands Heart Institute, Heidelberglaan 100, room G02.523, 3584 CX Utrecht, The Netherlands.
6
Global Research Laboratory, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 123 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712, South Korea.
7
Department of Cardiology, University Medical Center Utrecht and ICIN Netherlands Heart Institute, Heidelberglaan 100, room G02.523, 3584 CX Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Heart failure is characterized by a debilitating decline in cardiac function, and recent clinical trial results indicate that improving the contractility of heart muscle cells by boosting intracellular calcium handling might be an effective therapy. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are dysregulated in heart failure but whether they control contractility or constitute therapeutic targets remains speculative. Using high-throughput functional screening of the human microRNAome, here we identify miRNAs that suppress intracellular calcium handling in heart muscle by interacting with messenger RNA encoding the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake pump SERCA2a (also known as ATP2A2). Of 875 miRNAs tested, miR-25 potently delayed calcium uptake kinetics in cardiomyocytes in vitro and was upregulated in heart failure, both in mice and humans. Whereas adeno-associated virus 9 (AAV9)-mediated overexpression of miR-25 in vivo resulted in a significant loss of contractile function, injection of an antisense oligonucleotide (antagomiR) against miR-25 markedly halted established heart failure in a mouse model, improving cardiac function and survival relative to a control antagomiR oligonucleotide. These data reveal that increased expression of endogenous miR-25 contributes to declining cardiac function during heart failure and suggest that it might be targeted therapeutically to restore function.

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PMID:
24670661
PMCID:
PMC4131725
DOI:
10.1038/nature13073
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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