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Int J Mol Sci. 2014 Mar 25;15(4):5263-76. doi: 10.3390/ijms15045263.

Endothelialization of novel magnesium-rare earth alloys with fluoride and collagen coating.

Author information

1
Department of Chemical, Biological and Bio-Engineering, NSF Engineering Research Center-Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, NC 27411, USA. nzhao@aggies.ncat.edu.
2
Department of Chemical, Biological and Bio-Engineering, NSF Engineering Research Center-Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, NC 27411, USA. bdworkma@live.unc.edu.
3
Department of Chemical, Biological and Bio-Engineering, NSF Engineering Research Center-Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, NC 27411, USA. dzhu@ncat.edu.

Abstract

Magnesium (Mg) alloys are promising scaffolds for the next generation of cardiovascular stents because of their better biocompatibility and biodegradation compared to traditional metals. However, insufficient mechanical strength and high degradation rate are still the two main limitations for Mg materials. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) treatment and collagen coating were used in this research to improve the endothelialization of two rare earth-based Mg alloys. Results demonstrated that a nanoporous film structure of fluoride with thickness of ~20 µm was formed on the Mg material surface, which improved the corrosion resistance. Primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) had much better attachment, spreading, growth and proliferation (the process of endothelialization) on HF-treated Mg materials compared to bare- or collagen-coated ones.

PMID:
24670478
PMCID:
PMC4013562
DOI:
10.3390/ijms15045263
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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