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World J Pediatr Congenit Heart Surg. 2014 Apr;5(2):200-5. doi: 10.1177/2150135113519456.

Heart transplantation in pediatric and congenital heart disease: a single-center experience.

Author information

1
Green Lane Pediatric and Congenital Cardiac Services, Starship Children's Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To describe the indications and outcomes for pediatric patients and patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) undergoing heart transplantation (HT) in New Zealand.

METHODS:

A retrospective audit of 253 patients who underwent HT from 1987 to end 2012 was undertaken. Thirty-seven patients were subdivided into two groups, those aged <18 years--pediatric heart disease (PHD) and those with CHD. Six patients aged <18 years were included in both the analyses. Demographic and clinical information were collected and outcomes established.

RESULTS:

Overall actuarial survival of 37 patients with PHD or CHD was 92% at one year, 85% at five years, and 52% at ten years. The PHD group comprised 22 (8.7%) patients, median age 14 years (range 6-17), 14 (64%) male, with cardiomyopathy in 13, CHD in 6, and rheumatic heart disease in 3. At follow-up, 11 patients had died. Actuarial survival was 91% at one year and 79% at five years. Of the four patients with a mechanical assist device to bridge, three were transplanted and alive at follow-up. The CHD group comprised 21 (8.3%) patients, median age 25 years (range 6-48) and 19 (90%) were male. At follow-up, three patients had died. Actuarial survival was 95% at one year, 94% at five years, and 85% at ten years. All five patients with pre-HT Fontan circulation were alive a median of eight years following HT.

CONCLUSION:

Heart transplantation for carefully selected pediatric patients and patients with CHD can be successfully performed with favorable outcomes in a geographically isolated unit.

KEYWORDS:

congenital; heart; outcome; pediatric; transplantation

PMID:
24668964
DOI:
10.1177/2150135113519456
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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