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J Strength Cond Res. 2014 Apr;28(4):928-34. doi: 10.1097/JSC.0000000000000223.

Development of repeated sprint ability in talented youth basketball players.

Author information

1
1Center for Human Movement Sciences, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands; 2Clinical Neuropsychology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 3School for Sport Studies, Hanze University of Applied Sciences Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands; 4Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas; and 5Institute for Studies in Sports and Exercise, HAN University of Applied Sciences, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

Abstract

Factors affecting repeated sprint ability (RSA) were evaluated in a mixed-longitudinal sample of 48 elite basketball players 14-19 years of age (16.1 ± 1.7 years). Players were observed on 6 occasions during the 2008-09 and 2009-10 seasons. Three following basketball-specific field tests were administered on each occasion: the shuttle sprint test for RSA, the vertical jump for lower body explosive strength (power), and the interval shuttle run test for interval endurance capacity. Height and weight were measured; body composition was estimated (percent fat, lean body mass). Multilevel modeling of RSA development curve was used with 32 players (16.0 ± 1.7 years) who had 2 or more observations. The 16 players (16.1 ± 1.8 years) measured on only 1 occasion were used as a control group to evaluate the appropriateness of the model. Age, lower body explosive strength, and interval endurance capacity significantly contributed to RSA (p ≤ 0.05). Repeated sprint ability improved with age from 14 to 17 years (p ≤ 0.05) and reached a plateau at 17-19 years. Predicted RSA did not significantly differ from measured RSA in the control group (p ≥ 0.05). The results suggest a potentially important role for the training of lower body explosive strength and interval endurance capacity in the development of RSA among youth basketball players. Age-specific reference values for RSA of youth players may assist basketball coaches in setting appropriate goals for individual players.

PMID:
24667248
DOI:
10.1097/JSC.0000000000000223
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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