Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Nurs Adm. 2014 Apr;44(4):212-8. doi: 10.1097/NNA.0000000000000052.

An exploration of relational aggression in the nursing workplace.

Author information

1
Author Affiliations: Professor of Humanities and Professor of Women's Studies (Dr Dellasega); Assistant Professor (Dr Volpe); and Research Assistant (Ms Hopkins), College of Medicine, Department of Humanities, The Pennsylvania State University, Hershey; and Chief Nursing Officer (Dr Edmonson), Texas Health Dallas.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study provides a 1st look at relational aggression (RA) and the consequences among nurses.

BACKGROUND:

Interpersonal hostility, bullying, and a toxic work environment (WE) can impact patient care delivery as well as nurses' personal health and job satisfaction.

METHODS:

The Relational Aggression Assessment Scale, measuring aggressors, victims, and bystanders, was used to measure RA in a sample of 842 nurses. Additional variables measured included a demographic profile, job satisfaction, and intent to leave.

RESULTS:

Nurses were most likely to identify with victim behaviors, but a minority of nurses reported relying on aggressor behaviors and bystander behaviors. There was a positive correlation among aggressor, victim, and bystander items, suggesting overlap in roles.

CONCLUSIONS:

A few relationally aggressive individuals can create a toxic WE. Interventions to address RA among nurses must be tested, as well as strategies for improving job satisfaction and promoting healthy WEs through positive relationships.

PMID:
24662690
PMCID:
PMC4219359
DOI:
10.1097/NNA.0000000000000052
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center