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Nat Commun. 2014 Mar 24;5:3504. doi: 10.1038/ncomms4504.

Plant GSK3 proteins regulate xylem cell differentiation downstream of TDIF-TDR signalling.

Author information

1
Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.
2
1] Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan [2] Department of Integrated Genetics, National Institute of Genetics, Yata 1111, Mishima, Shizuoka 411-8540, Japan.
3
RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science, 7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Kanagawa, Yokohama, Japan.
4
1] Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan [2] School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800, Australia.

Abstract

During plant radial growth typically seen in trees, procambial and cambial cells act as meristematic cells in the vascular system to self-proliferate and differentiate into xylem cells. These two processes are regulated by a signalling pathway composed of a peptide ligand and its receptor; tracheary element differentiation inhibitory factor (TDIF) and TDIF RECEPTOR (TDR). Here we show that glycogen synthase kinase 3 proteins (GSK3s) are crucial downstream components of the TDIF signalling pathway suppressing xylem differentiation from procambial cells. TDR interacts with GSK3s at the plasma membrane and activates GSK3s in a TDIF-dependent fashion. Consistently, a specific inhibitor of plant GSK3s strongly induces xylem cell differentiation through BRI1-EMS SUPPRESSOR 1 (BES1), a well-known target transcription factor of GSK3s. Our findings provide insight into the regulation of cell fate determination in meristem maintenance.

PMID:
24662460
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms4504
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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