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Mech Ageing Dev. 2014 Mar-Apr;136-137:94-100. doi: 10.1016/j.mad.2014.03.002. Epub 2014 Mar 21.

Reprint of: Musculoskeletal system in the old age and the demand for healthy ageing biomarkers.

Author information

1
Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences, Molecular Biomarkers, EPFL Innovation park, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland. Electronic address: sebastiano.collino@rd.nestle.com.
2
Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences, Molecular Biomarkers, EPFL Innovation park, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
3
Nestlé Research Center, Nutrition and Health, Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26, Switzerland.
4
Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences, Natural Bioactives and Screening, EPFL Innovation park, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
5
Interdepartmental Centre "L. Galvani" CIG, University of Bologna, Via Belmeloro 3, 40126 Bologna, Italy.
6
Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences, Molecular Biomarkers, EPFL Innovation park, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland; Faculty of Life Sciences, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland; Faculty of Science, Interdisciplinary NanoScience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.

Abstract

Population ageing has emerged as a major demographic trend worldwide due to improved health and longevity. This global ageing phenomenon will have a major impact on health-care systems worldwide due to increased morbidity and greater needs for hospitalization/institutionalization. As the ageing population increases worldwide, there is an increasing awareness not only of increased longevity but also of the importance of "healthy ageing" and "quality of life". Yet, the age related chronic inflammation is believed to be pathogenic with regards to its contribution to frailty and degenerative disorders. In particular, the frailty syndrome is increasingly being considered as a key risk indicator of adverse health outcomes. In addition, elderly may be also prone to be resistant to anabolic stimuli which is likely a key factor in the loss of skeletal muscle mass with ageing. Vital to understand these key biological processes is the development of biological markers, through system biology approaches, aiding at strategies for tailored therapeutic and personalized nutritional program. Overall aim is to prevent or attenuate decline of key physiological functions required to live an active, independent life. This review focus on core indicators of health and functions in older adults, where nutrition and tailored personalized programs could exhibit preventive roles, and where the aid of metabolomics technologies are increasingly displaying potential in revealing key molecular mechanisms/targets linked to specific ageing and/or healthy ageing processes.

KEYWORDS:

Ageing; Bone; Longevity; Metabolomics; Muscle

PMID:
24662191
DOI:
10.1016/j.mad.2014.03.002

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