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J Abnorm Psychol. 2014 Feb;123(1):35-48. doi: 10.1037/a0035834.

Neural substrates of trait ruminations in depression.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh.
2
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.
3
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia VA Medical Center.

Abstract

Rumination in depression is a risk factor for longer, more intense, and harder-to-treat depressions. But there appear to be multiple types of depressive rumination-whether they all share these vulnerability mechanisms, and thus would benefit from the same types of clinical attention is unclear. In the current study, we examined neural correlates of empirically derived dimensions of trait rumination in 35 depressed participants. These individuals and 29 never-depressed controls completed 17 self-report measures of rumination and an alternating emotion-processing/executive-control task during functional MRI (fMRI) assessment. We examined associations of regions of interest--the amygdala and other cortical regions subserving a potential role in deficient cognitive control and elaborative emotion-processing--with trait rumination. Rumination of all types was generally associated with increased sustained amygdala reactivity. When controlling for amygdala reactivity, distinct activity patterns in hippocampus were also associated with specific dimensions of rumination. We discuss the possibly utility of targeting more basic biological substrates of emotional reactivity in depressed patients who frequently ruminate.

PMID:
24661157
PMCID:
PMC4128503
DOI:
10.1037/a0035834
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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