Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Neurobiol Aging. 2014 Aug;35(8):1862-72. doi: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2014.02.008. Epub 2014 Feb 15.

Widespread age-related differences in the human brain microstructure revealed by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging.

Author information

1
Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK. Electronic address: m.callaghan@ucl.ac.uk.
2
Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK; Spinal Cord Injury Center Balgrist, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; Department of Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.
3
Department des Neurosciences Cliniques, LREN, CHUV, Universite de Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.
4
Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.
5
Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, London, UK; Psychology Department, Goldsmiths College, University of London, London, UK.
6
Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, London, UK.
7
MR Research in Neurology and Psychiatry, Goettingen University, Goettingen, Germany.

Abstract

A pressing need exists to disentangle age-related changes from pathologic neurodegeneration. This study aims to characterize the spatial pattern and age-related differences of biologically relevant measures in vivo over the course of normal aging. Quantitative multiparameter maps that provide neuroimaging biomarkers for myelination and iron levels, parameters sensitive to aging, were acquired from 138 healthy volunteers (age range: 19-75 years). Whole-brain voxel-wise analysis revealed a global pattern of age-related degeneration. Significant demyelination occurred principally in the white matter. The observed age-related differences in myelination were anatomically specific. In line with invasive histologic reports, higher age-related differences were seen in the genu of the corpus callosum than the splenium. Iron levels were significantly increased in the basal ganglia, red nucleus, and extensive cortical regions but decreased along the superior occipitofrontal fascicle and optic radiation. This whole-brain pattern of age-associated microstructural differences in the asymptomatic population provides insight into the neurobiology of aging. The results help build a quantitative baseline from which to examine and draw a dividing line between healthy aging and pathologic neurodegeneration.

KEYWORDS:

3T; Aging; MT; Magnetization transfer; Quantitative; R1; R2*; Relaxation; T1; T2*; VBQ; Water content

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center