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Pediatr Neurol. 2014 May;50(5):452-7. doi: 10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2013.12.019. Epub 2013 Dec 31.

Development and implementation of a quality improvement curriculum for child neurology residents: lessons learned.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Neurology, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: Kiran.maski@childrens.harvard.edu.
2
Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Neurology, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
3
Department of Neurology, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
4
Department of Neurology, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Quality improvement is a major component of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies required of all medical trainees. Currently, neither the Neurology Residency Review Committee nor the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education defines the process by which this competency should be taught and assessed. We developed a quality improvement curriculum that provides mentorship for resident quality improvement projects and is clinically relevant to pediatric neurologists.

METHODS:

Before and after implementation of the quality improvement curriculum, a 14-item survey assessed resident comfort with quality improvement project skills and attitudes about implementation of quality improvement in clinical practice using a 5-point Likert scale. We used the Kruskal-Wallis and Fisher exact tests to evaluate pre to post changes.

RESULTS:

Residents' gained confidence in their abilities to identify measures (P = 0.02) and perform root cause analysis (P = 0.02). Overall, 73% of residents were satisfied or very satisfied with the quality improvement curriculum.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our child neurology quality improvement curriculum was well accepted by trainees. We report the details of this curriculum and its impact on residents and discuss its potential to meet the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System requirements.

KEYWORDS:

Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education; neurology; quality improvement; residency

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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