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J Genet Genomics. 2014 Mar 20;41(3):107-15. doi: 10.1016/j.jgg.2014.01.009. Epub 2014 Feb 20.

The synaptonemal complex of basal metazoan hydra: more similarities to vertebrate than invertebrate meiosis model organisms.

Author information

1
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Biocenter, University of Würzburg, D-97074 Würzburg, Germany. Electronic address: johanna.fraune@uni-wuerzburg.de.
2
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Biocenter, University of Würzburg, D-97074 Würzburg, Germany.
3
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Biocenter, University of Würzburg, D-97074 Würzburg, Germany. Electronic address: benavente@biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de.

Abstract

The synaptonemal complex (SC) is an evolutionarily well-conserved structure that mediates chromosome synapsis during prophase of the first meiotic division. Although its structure is conserved, the characterized protein components in the current metazoan meiosis model systems (Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Mus musculus) show no sequence homology, challenging the question of a single evolutionary origin of the SC. However, our recent studies revealed the monophyletic origin of the mammalian SC protein components. Many of them being ancient in Metazoa and already present in the cnidarian Hydra. Remarkably, a comparison between different model systems disclosed a great similarity between the SC components of Hydra and mammals while the proteins of the ecdysozoan systems (D. melanogaster and C. elegans) differ significantly. In this review, we introduce the basal-branching metazoan species Hydra as a potential novel invertebrate model system for meiosis research and particularly for the investigation of SC evolution, function and assembly. Also, available methods for SC research in Hydra are summarized.

KEYWORDS:

Evolution; Hydra; Meiosis; Synaptonemal complex

PMID:
24656231
DOI:
10.1016/j.jgg.2014.01.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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