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BJU Int. 2015 Apr;115(4):508-19. doi: 10.1111/bju.12745. Epub 2014 Oct 16.

Burden of male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) - focus on the UK.

Author information

1
Department of Urology, Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton, UK.

Abstract

Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) can be bothersome and negatively impact on a patient's quality of life (QoL). As the prevalence of LUTS/BPH increases with age, the burden on the healthcare system and society may increase due to the ageing population. This review unifies literature on the burden of LUTS/BPH on patients and society, particularly in the UK. LUTS/BPH is associated with high personal and societal costs, both in direct medical costs and indirect losses in daily functioning, and through its negative impact on QoL for patients and partners. LUTS/BPH is often underdiagnosed and undertreated. Men should be encouraged to seek medical advice for this condition and should not accept it as part of ageing, while clinicians should be more active in the identification and treatment of LUTS/BPH. To assess the burden of illness and unmet need arising from lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) presumed secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) from an individual patient and societal perspective with a focus on the UK. Embase, PubMed, the World Health Organization, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the York Centre for Reviews and Dissemination were searched to identify studies on the epidemiological, humanistic or economic burden of LUTS/BPH published in English between October 2001 and January 2013. Data were extracted and the quality of the studies was assessed for inclusion. UK data were reported; in the absence of UK data, European and USA data were provided. In all, 374 abstracts were identified, 104 full papers were assessed and 33 papers met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. An additional paper was included in the review upon a revision in 2014. The papers show that LUTS are common in the UK, affecting ≈3% of men aged 45-49 years, rising to >30% in men aged ≥85 years. European and USA studies have reported the major impact of LUTS on quality of life of the patient and their partner. LUTS are associated with high personal and societal costs, both in direct medical costs and indirect losses in daily functioning. While treatment costs in the UK are relatively low compared with other countries, the burden on health services is still substantial. LUTS associated with BPH is a highly impactful condition that is often undertreated. LUTS/BPH have a major impact on men, their families, health services and society. Men with LUTS secondary to BPH should not simply accept their symptoms as part of ageing, but should be encouraged to consult their physicians if they have bothersome symptoms.

KEYWORDS:

BPH; LUTS; burden of illness; economics; epidemiology; quality of life

PMID:
24656222
DOI:
10.1111/bju.12745
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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