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Transplant Proc. 2014;46(2):445-8. doi: 10.1016/j.transproceed.2013.09.036.

Outcome comparison of ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation with low-dose rituximab and ABO-compatible kidney transplantation: a single-center experience.

Author information

1
Department of Urology, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Japan. Electronic address: shingorilla2@gmail.com.
2
Department of Cardiology, Respiratory Medicine and Nephrology, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Japan.
3
Department of Urology, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Japan.
4
Department of Urology, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Japan; Advanced Transplant and Regenerative Medicine, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Japan.
5
Advanced Transplant and Regenerative Medicine, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Japan.
6
Department of Transplant Surgery, Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, Hirosaki, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The development of immunosuppressive techniques has helped overcome the ABO incompatibility barrier. However, the outcomes of ABO-incompatible (ABOi) kidney transplantation remain a controversial issue with the advent of the anti-CD20 chimeric antibody rituximab. Herein, we report the outcomes of ABOi kidney transplantation with low-dose rituximab.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Between June 2006 and April 2013, 42 patients underwent living-related kidney transplantation at our hospital. The patients were divided into 2 groups: ABO-compatible (ABOc; n = 29) and ABOi kidney transplants using low-dose rituximab (100 mg/m(2)) without splenectomy (n = 13). The basic immunosuppression regimen (calcineurin inhibitor [CNI], mycophenolate mofetil [MMF], and steroids) was the same for both groups, except for the use of rituximab and therapeutic apheresis in the ABOi group. We compared post-transplantation renal function, incidents of virus infection, episodes of rejection, and graft survival between the 2 groups.

RESULTS:

In our hospital, 30% of recipients received ABOi kidney transplants. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) did not differ between the groups. Rejection episodes confirmed by biopsy in the ABOc and ABOi groups were 8 (28%) and 4 (31%) patients (P = .833), acute antibody-mediated rejection was observed in 1 (3.5%) and 2 (15%) patients (P = .165), and virus infection was observed in 14 (48%) and 3 (23%) patients (P = .252), respectively. The 5-year patient survival rate was 100% in both groups, and the 5-year graft survival rates were 95% for ABOc and 100% for ABOi transplants (P = .527).

CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest that the outcomes of ABOi kidney transplantation with low-dose rituximab are similar to those of ABOc kidney transplantation. Further study is necessary to address the efficacy and safety of ABOi kidney transplantation.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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