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J Am Coll Health. 2014;62(5):320-7. doi: 10.1080/07448481.2014.899233.

Mobile MyPlate: a pilot study using text messaging to provide nutrition education and promote better dietary choices in college students.

Author information

1
a Department of Nutrition, Dietetics and Hospitality , Auburn University , Auburn , Alabama.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the acceptance and effectiveness of repetitive nutrition-related text messages on college students' nutrition knowledge and fruit and vegetable consumption.

PARTICIPANTS:

One hundred fifty undergraduate (18-24 years old) non-health major students with a texting mobile phone.

METHODS:

The intervention group received biweekly text messages of the MyPlate icon and the United States Department of Agriculture's Dietary Guidelines (DGs) for 7 weeks. The control group received the same information in a mailed brochure. A pre and post online survey assessed the students' knowledge and behavior.

RESULTS:

The intervention resulted in greater MyPlate food group recognition (p <.05) compared with control and a trend toward improved knowledge of the DGs. In the intervention group, fruit consumption was elevated (p <.05) and a trend toward elevated vegetable consumption was determined. No gender differences in intervention effectiveness exist.

CONCLUSION:

Texting repeated messages appears to be an acceptable and effective way to increase nutrition knowledge and promote positive diet-related behaviors in college students.

KEYWORDS:

MyPlate; adolescents; college; health education; nutrition

PMID:
24654921
DOI:
10.1080/07448481.2014.899233
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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