Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Appl Gerontol. 2014 Oct;33(7):870-87. doi: 10.1177/0733464813512896. Epub 2013 Dec 11.

Low-intensity walking activity is associated with better health.

Author information

1
Johns Hopkins Center on Aging and Health, Baltimore, MD, USA Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA vvarma@jhsph.edu.
2
The Corporation for National and Community Service, Washington, DC, USA.
3
Johns Hopkins Center on Aging and Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.
4
Columbia University, New York, USA.
5
University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, NY, USA.
6
Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USA.
7
University of California, Los Angeles, USA.
8
Johns Hopkins Center on Aging and Health, Baltimore, MD, USA Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Abstract

Recommended levels of physical activity may represent challenging targets for many older adults at risk for disability, leading to the importance of evaluating whether low-intensity activity is associated with health benefits. We examined the cross-sectional association between low-intensity walking activity (<100 steps/min) and health and physical function in a group of older adults. Participants (N = 187; age = 66.8; 91.4% African American; 76.5% female) wore a StepWatch Activity Monitor to measure components of low-intensity walking activity. Only 7% of participants met physical activity guidelines and moderate-intensity activity (≥100 steps/min) contributed only 10% of the total steps/day and 2% of the total min/day. Greater amount, frequency, and duration of low-intensity activity were associated with better self-report and performance-based measures of physical function, better quality of life, and fewer depressive symptoms (ps < .05). The cross-sectional relationship between low-intensity activity and health outcomes important to independent function suggests that we further explore the longitudinal benefits of low-intensity activity.

KEYWORDS:

African Americans; low-intensity activity; mobility; physical activity; walking

PMID:
24652915
PMCID:
PMC4053519
DOI:
10.1177/0733464813512896
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center