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Sci Rep. 2014 Mar 21;4:4422. doi: 10.1038/srep04422.

Immune privilege of the CNS is not the consequence of limited antigen sampling.

Author information

1
1] Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI [2] Neuroscience Training Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI.
2
1] Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI [2] Cellular and Molecular Pathology Graduate Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI.
3
1] Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI [2] Department of Surgery, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI.
4
1] Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI [2] Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA.
5
Department of Pathology, Peking University, Beijing, China.
6
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI.
7
Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario.

Abstract

Central nervous system (CNS) immune privilege is complex, and it is still not understood how CNS antigens are sampled by the peripheral immune system under steady state conditions. To compare antigen sampling from immune-privileged or nonprivileged tissues, we created transgenic mice with oligodendrocyte or gut epithelial cell expression of an EGFP-tagged fusion protein containing ovalbumin (OVA) antigenic peptides and tested peripheral anti-OVA peptide-specific sentinel OT-I and OT-II T cell activation. We report that oligodendrocyte or gut antigens are sampled similarly, as determined by comparable levels of OT-I T cell activation. However, activated T cells do not access the CNS under steady state conditions. These data show that afferent immunity is normally intact as there is no barrier at the antigen sampling level, but that efferent immunity is restricted. To understand how this one-sided surveillance contributes to CNS immune privilege will help us define mechanisms of CNS autoimmune disease initiation.

PMID:
24651727
PMCID:
PMC3961746
DOI:
10.1038/srep04422
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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