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Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol. 2014 Apr;15(4):273-88. doi: 10.1038/nrm3769.

The integrin adhesome: from genes and proteins to human disease.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel.
2
Department of Molecular Medicine, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, 82152 Martinsried, Germany.
3
1] Department of Molecular Medicine, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, 82152 Martinsried, Germany. [2] Center for Nanosciences, Department of Applied Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians University, 80799 Munich, Germany.

Abstract

The adhesive interactions of cells with their environment through the integrin family of transmembrane receptors have key roles in regulating multiple aspects of cellular physiology, including cell proliferation, viability, differentiation and migration. Consequently, failure to establish functional cell adhesions, and thus the assembly of associated cytoplasmic scaffolding and signalling networks, can have severe pathological effects. The roles of specific constituents of integrin-mediated adhesions, which are collectively known as the 'integrin adhesome', in diverse pathological states are becoming clear. Indeed, the prominence of mutations in specific adhesome molecules in various human diseases is now appreciated, and experimental as well as in silico approaches provide insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying these pathological conditions.

PMID:
24651544
DOI:
10.1038/nrm3769
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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