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J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2014 Mar;75(2):235-40.

Alcohol dependence and reproductive timing in African and European ancestry women: findings in a midwestern twin cohort.

Author information

1
Department of Counseling and Educational Psychology, Indiana University School of Education, Bloomington, Indiana, Midwest Alcoholism Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.
2
Midwest Alcoholism Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.
3
Midwest Alcoholism Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri.
4
Midwest Alcoholism Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We examined associations between reproductive onset and history of alcohol dependence (AD) in 475 African ancestry (AA) and 2,865 European or other ancestry (EA) female twins.

METHOD:

Participants were drawn from a U.S. midwestern birth cohort study of like-sex female twin pairs born between 1975 and 1985, ages 21-32 as of last completed assessment. Cox proportional hazards regression models were estimated predicting age at first childbirth from history of AD, separately by race/ethnicity, without and with adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics, body mass index, history of other substance involvement, psychopathology, and family and childhood risks.

RESULTS:

Among EA twins, AD predicted early childbearing through age 17 and delayed childbearing from age 25 onward; in adjusted models, AD was associated with overall delayed childbearing. Among AA twins, reproductive timing and AD were not significantly related in either unadjusted or adjusted models.

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings for twins of European ancestry are consistent with well-documented links between early alcohol mis/use and teenage parenting as well as delays in childbearing associated with drinking-related reproductive and relationship difficulties. Extension of analyses to other racial/ethnic groups of sufficient sample size remains important.

PMID:
24650817
PMCID:
PMC3965677
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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