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Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2014 Jun;150(6):1040-2. doi: 10.1177/0194599814526557. Epub 2014 Mar 19.

Motion Perception in Patients with Idiopathic Bilateral Vestibular Hypofunction.

Author information

1
Department of Otology & Laryngology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Jenks Vestibular Physiology Laboratory, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
2
Jenks Vestibular Physiology Laboratory, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
3
Department of Otology & Laryngology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Jenks Vestibular Physiology Laboratory, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA richard_lewis@meei.harvard.edu.

Abstract

We measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in patients with idiopathic bilateral vestibulopathy to assess the distribution of peripheral vestibular damage in this disorder. Thresholds were measured with standard psychometric techniques in 4 patients and compared with thresholds in normal subjects and patients with completely absent peripheral vestibular function. Motion paradigms included yaw rotation (testing the lateral canals), interaural translation (testing the utricles), superior-inferior translation (testing the saccules), and roll tilt (testing the vertical semicircular canals and the otolith organs). We found that perceptual thresholds were abnormally elevated in the patients with idiopathic bilateral vestibulopathy for yaw rotation at all frequencies and for interaural translation at only the lower frequencies. Thresholds were normal for the other 2 motion paradigms. The results demonstrate that the distribution of vestibular dysfunction in this disorder is not uniform but, rather, can affect lateral canal and utricular thresholds while relatively sparing vertical canal and saccular function.

KEYWORDS:

motion; orientation; perception; psychophysics; vestibular

PMID:
24647642
DOI:
10.1177/0194599814526557
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