Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Vox Sang. 2014 Aug;107(2):132-9. doi: 10.1111/vox.12143. Epub 2014 Mar 20.

Donors' psychological reactions to deferral following false-positive screening test results.

Author information

1
Medical Affairs, Héma-Québec, Montreal, QC, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Being notified of a false-positive infectious disease marker result can cause psychological distress in blood donors. A new notification process, informing donors of the possibility of re-entry, was compared with the previous one in which donors were indefinitely deferred to evaluate the mitigating effect on donors' psychological distress levels.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Two groups of donors, 'deferred donors' (DD) and 'donors eligible for re-entry' (DER), completed a questionnaire involving 5-point scales. Levels of psychological distress, attitude towards blood donation, desire to donate blood in the future and perception of notification process quality were assessed.

RESULTS:

Attitudes towards blood donation (P = 0·0276) (DD: 3·94 ± 0·11 vs. DER 4·21 ± 0·09) and perceived quality of communication (P = 0·0108) (DD: 2·72 ± 0·12 vs. DER 3·08 ± 0·10) were significantly improved with the new notification process. No significant difference was found between groups in psychological distress levels or desire to donate blood in the future.

CONCLUSION:

Informing donors of the possibility of re-entry appears to contribute to maintaining a positive predisposition towards future blood donation. It does not, however, appear to alleviate the distress felt after being notified of a false-positive infectious disease marker result, nor does it increase willingness to give blood again in the future.

KEYWORDS:

attitudes; deferral; donor reactions; false positive; psychological distress; retention

PMID:
24646091
DOI:
10.1111/vox.12143
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center