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Gut Microbes. 2014 May-Jun;5(3):333-9. doi: 10.4161/gmic.28572. Epub 2014 Mar 18.

Characterization of the 17 strains of regulatory T cell-inducing human-derived Clostridia.

Author information

1
RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences (IMS-RCAI); Yokohama, Japan.
2
Department of Biochemistry; School of Medicine; Keio University; Tokyo, Japan; Japan Science and Technology Agency; Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology (PRESTO); Kawaguchi, Japan.
3
Graduate School of Frontier Sciences; The University of Tokyo; Kashiwa, Japan; Japan Science and Technology Agency; Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST); Kawaguchi, Japan.
4
RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences (IMS-RCAI); Yokohama, Japan; Japan Science and Technology Agency; Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology (PRESTO); Kawaguchi, Japan.
5
Graduate School of Frontier Sciences; The University of Tokyo; Kashiwa, Japan.
6
Department of Biochemistry; School of Medicine; Keio University; Tokyo, Japan; Japan Science and Technology Agency; Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology (ERATO); Suematsu Gas Biology Project; Tokyo, Japan.
7
RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences (IMS-RCAI); Yokohama, Japan; Japan Science and Technology Agency; Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST); Kawaguchi, Japan.

Abstract

The gut microbiota plays important roles in the development of the host immune system. We have previously shown that a combination of 46 strains of commensal Clostridia isolated from conventionally reared mice can induce the accumulation of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells in the mouse colonic lamina propria. Subsequently, we succeeded in isolating and selecting 17 strains of Clostridia from a healthy human fecal sample that can significantly increase the number and function of colonic Treg cells in colonized rodents, thereby attenuating symptoms of experimental allergic diarrhea and colitis. Here we characterize each of the 17 strains of human-derived Clostridia in terms of sensitivity to antibiotics and ability to produce short chain fatty acids and other metabolites, and discuss their potential as biotherapeutics to correct dysbiosis and treat immune-inflammatory diseases.

KEYWORDS:

Clostridia; Treg; gut microbiota

PMID:
24642476
PMCID:
PMC4153770
DOI:
10.4161/gmic.28572
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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