Format

Send to

Choose Destination
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014 Mar 18;14:105. doi: 10.1186/1471-2393-14-105.

Secular trends of low birthweight and macrosomia and related maternal factors in Beijing, China: a longitudinal trend analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Capital Institute of Pediatrics, Beijing 100020, China. jiemi@vip.163.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Information tracking changes of birthweight is scarce in China. To examine trends of low birthweight (birthweight < 2500 g) and macrosomia (birthweight ≥ 4000 g) and potential risk factors in Beijing, hospital records from two major obstetrics and gynecology hospitals in urban districts in Beijing were analyzed.

METHODS:

Hospital records from 1996 to 2010 were retrieved. Information of prenatal examination and birth outcomes was entered into a structured database. Live births were used for trend analysis. Information of live births in 2010 was used to identify potential risk factors.

RESULTS:

A total of 63 661 live births were delivered during 1996-2010 in the study hospitals. The average birthweight increased from 3271 g in 1996 to 3 359 g in 2000 and slightly declined to 3 331 in 2010. The percentage of low birthweight fluctuated around 4.0%. No significant increase or decrease was observed. Preterm birth was the main cause of low birthweight, accounting for more than 73% of low birthweight. The average percentage of macrosomia was 7.6%. The percentages of macrosomia increased from 6.6% in 1996 to 9.5% in 2000 and declined to 7.0% in 2010. Excessive gestational weight gain and gestational diabetes were significantly associated with macrosomia.

CONCLUSIONS:

Continuously monitoring abnormal birthweight is needed and intervention should focus on appropriate gestational weight gain and reduction of preterm birth and gestational diabetes.

PMID:
24641671
PMCID:
PMC4003827
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2393-14-105
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center