Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Int J Health Policy Manag. 2014 Feb 22;2(2):65-7. doi: 10.15171/ijhpm.2014.16. eCollection 2014 Feb.

Deadly professions: violent attacks against aid-workers and the health implications for local populations.

Author information

1
School of Population and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
2
School of Population and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada ; Regional Knowledge Hub, and WHO Collaborating Center for HIV Surveillance, Institute for Futures Studies in Health, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran.

Abstract

War has devastating implications for families, communities, cultures, economies, and state infrastructure. Similarly, the last decade has seen an increase in the number of attacks against health workers in conflict zones and unstable environments. Unfortunately, these attacks have grave consequences for local populations which often rely on foreign aid programs for their health and well-being. As such, this paper will examine why aid-workers have increasingly been targeted for abductions, ambushes, assassinations, and various forms of intimidation. Furthermore, examples of terminated health programs, as well as populations served by current medical and humanitarian interventions, will be provided to impart a sense of magnitude and importance of health programs to the reader. Lastly, suggestions will be presented which could serve to minimize aid-workers' risk and exposure to acts of violence in the field.

KEYWORDS:

Attacks; Health; Humanitarian Assistance; Impartiality; NGO; War

PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center