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Gut Microbes. 2014 Jan-Feb;5(1):28-39. doi: 10.4161/gmic.26489. Epub 2013 Sep 25.

Proteobacteria-specific IgA regulates maturation of the intestinal microbiota.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics; Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center; Dallas, TX USA.
2
Department of Immunology; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center; Dallas, TX USA.
3
Department of Immunology; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center; Dallas, TX USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center; Dallas, TX USA.

Abstract

The intestinal microbiota changes dynamically from birth to adulthood. In this study we identified γ-Proteobacteria as a dominant phylum present in newborn mice that is suppressed in normal adult microbiota. The transition from a neonatal to a mature microbiota was in part regulated by induction of a γ-Proteobacteria-specific IgA response. Neocolonization experiments in germ-free mice further revealed a dominant Proteobacteria-specific IgA response triggered by the immature microbiota. Finally, a role for B cells in the regulation of microbiota maturation was confirmed in IgA-deficient mice. Mice lacking IgA had persistent intestinal colonization with γ-Proteobacteria that resulted in sustained intestinal inflammation and increased susceptibility to neonatal and adult models of intestinal injury. Collectively, these results identify an IgA-dependent mechanism responsible for the maturation of the intestinal microbiota.

KEYWORDS:

IgA; colitis; microbiota; necrotizing enterocolitis; proteobacteria

PMID:
24637807
PMCID:
PMC4049932
DOI:
10.4161/gmic.26489
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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