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Fertil Steril. 2014 May;101(5):1280-7. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2014.02.003. Epub 2014 Mar 14.

Dairy intake and semen quality among men attending a fertility clinic.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: mafeiche@hsph.harvard.edu.
2
Department of Global Health and Population Global Health MPH Program, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Illinois, Chicago, Illinois.
3
Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
4
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
5
Department of Urology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
6
Vincent Obstetrics and Gynecology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
7
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Vincent Obstetrics and Gynecology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
8
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the relationship between dairy food intake and semen parameters.

DESIGN:

Longitudinal study.

SETTING:

Academic medical center fertility clinic.

PATIENT(S):

One hundred fifty-five men.

INTERVENTION(S):

None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Total sperm count, sperm concentration, progressive motility, morphology, and semen volume.

RESULT(S):

Low-fat dairy intake was positively related to sperm concentration and progressive motility. On average, men in the highest quartile of intake (1.22-3.54 servings/d) had 33% (95% confidence interval [CI] 1, 55) higher sperm concentration and 9.3 percentage units (95% CI 1.4, 17.2) higher sperm motility than men in the lowest quartile of intake (≤0.28 servings/d). These associations were primarily explained by intake of low-fat milk. The corresponding results for low-fat milk were 30% (95% CI 1, 51) higher sperm concentration and 8.7 percentage units (95% CI 3.0, 14.4) higher sperm motility. Cheese intake was associated with lower sperm concentration among ever-smokers. In this group, men in the highest tertile of intake (0.82-2.43 servings/d) had 53.2% (95% CI 9.7, 75.7) lower sperm concentration than men in the lowest tertile of cheese intake (<0.43 servings/d).

CONCLUSION(S):

Our findings suggest that low-fat dairy intake, particularly low-fat milk, is related to higher sperm concentration and progressive motility, whereas cheese intake is related to lower sperm concentration among past or current smokers.

KEYWORDS:

Infertility; dairy; diet; sperm quality

PMID:
24636397
PMCID:
PMC4008690
DOI:
10.1016/j.fertnstert.2014.02.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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