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Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2014 Jun;53(7):639-44. doi: 10.1177/0009922814526976. Epub 2014 Mar 14.

A randomized controlled trial of clinician-led tactile stimulation to reduce pain during vaccination in infants.

Author information

1
University of Toronto, ON, Canada The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada anna.taddio@utoronto.ca.
2
Dr Tommy Ho Paediatric Clinic, Toronto, ON, Canada.
3
University of Toronto, ON, Canada.
4
Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Clinician-led tactile stimulation (rubbing the skin adjacent to the injection site or applying pressure) has been demonstrated to reduce pain in children and adults undergoing vaccination.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the analgesic effectiveness of clinician-led tactile stimulation in infants undergoing vaccination.

METHODS:

This was a partially blinded randomized controlled trial that included infants undergoing vaccination in a private clinic in Toronto. Infants were randomly allocated to tactile stimulation or no tactile stimulation immediately prior to, during, and after vaccination. The primary outcome was infant pain, assessed using a validated observational measure, the Modified Behavioral Pain Scale (MBPS; range = 0-10).

RESULTS:

Altogether, 121 infants participated (n = 62 tactile stimulation; n = 59 control); demographics did not differ (P > .05) between groups. MBPS scores did not differ between groups: mean = 7.2 (standard deviation = 2.4) versus 7.6 (1.9); P = .245.

CONCLUSION:

Tactile stimulation cannot be recommended as a strategy to reduce vaccination pain in infants because of insufficient evidence of a benefit.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01601197.

KEYWORDS:

pain management; randomized controlled trial; tactile stimulation; vaccination

PMID:
24634424
DOI:
10.1177/0009922814526976
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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