Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 2014 Mar;123(3):214-21. doi: 10.1177/0003489414522977.

High-dose sublesional bevacizumab (avastin) for pediatric recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Boston, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We review and report the use of high-dose bevacizumab for the treatment of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) in pediatric patients.

METHODS:

We included all patients with pediatric-onset RRP who underwent bevacizumab (25 mg/mL) injections by a single practitioner. A series of 5 consecutive subepithelial injections were administered at 4- to 6-week intervals with concomitant 532 nm KTP laser ablation. The lesions were staged according to the Derkay staging system. The outcomes included pretreatment and posttreatment Derkay scores, the time interval between procedures, and voice outcomes. The demographic data extracted included sex, age at diagnosis, and current age.

RESULTS:

Nine patients were included in this study, with 1 patient lost to follow-up; their median age was 8 years (range, 3 to 21 years). The mean bevacizumab dose was 14.25 mg (range, 5 to 45 mg). There was a median Derkay score of 11.5 (range, 4 to 23) at the time of diagnosis and a median 58% improvement following therapy. All patients demonstrated an increased time interval between injections, for a median improvement of 2.05× (range, 1.6× to 3.25×).

CONCLUSIONS:

Evidence exists in support of vascular endothelial growth factor as an important factor in the development of RRP. Although some variability in response is demonstrated by this study, high-dose bevacizumab appears to yield promising results for pediatric patients with RRP.

KEYWORDS:

bevacizumab; papilloma; pediatrics; recurrent respiratory papillomatosis

PMID:
24633948
DOI:
10.1177/0003489414522977
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon
    Loading ...
    Support Center