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Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2015 Jan-Mar;29(1):45-9. doi: 10.1097/WAD.0000000000000037.

The rest-activity rhythm and physical activity in early-onset dementia.

Author information

1
*Department of Clinical Neuropsychology, VU University †Alzheimer Center & Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam ‡Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A substantial part of elderly persons with dementia show rest-activity rhythm disturbances. The rest-activity rhythm is important to study in people with early-onset dementia (EOD) for rest-activity rhythm disturbances are predictive of institutionalization, and caregivers of young patients suffer from high distress.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to study (1) whether EOD patients have more rest-activity rhythm disturbances compared with cognitively intact adults; and (2) which factors contribute to a disturbed rhythm.

METHODS:

We included 61 patients with EOD [mean age 61.9 (4.9) y, 41 (67%) men] and 68 cognitively intact adults [mean age 61.6 (4.5) y, 28 (41%) men]. Rest-activity rhythm was assessed by actigraphy.

RESULTS:

EOD patients tended to have higher intradaily variability [0.46 (0.16) and 0.39 (0.10), P=0.03]. EOD patients also lay for a longer time in bed [time in bed: 08:49 (0:51) h and 08:07 (0:47) h, P<0.001] and needed more time to fall asleep [sleep onset latency: 23 (22) min and 15 (15) min, P=0.02]. Disturbances in the rest-activity rhythm were predicted by a low level of physical activity, use of antidepressants and central nervous system neurological medications, and being male.

CONCLUSIONS:

EOD patients showed more variability in the rest-activity rhythm compared with cognitively intact adults. The main predictor for rest-activity rhythm disturbances was a low level of physical activity.

PMID:
24632989
DOI:
10.1097/WAD.0000000000000037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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