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Microbes Infect. 2014 Jun;16(6):512-7. doi: 10.1016/j.micinf.2014.02.011. Epub 2014 Mar 12.

Experimental phage therapy against lethal lung-derived septicemia caused by Staphylococcus aureus in mice.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Infection, Faculty of Medicine, Kochi University, Kochi, Japan; Clinical Laboratory, Kochi University Hospital, Kochi, Japan.
2
Department of Microbiology and Infection, Faculty of Medicine, Kochi University, Kochi, Japan; Center for Innovative and Translational Medicine, Kochi University, Kochi, Japan.
3
Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Kochi University, Kochi, Japan.
4
Clinical Laboratory, Kochi University Hospital, Kochi, Japan.
5
Science Research Center, Kochi University, Kochi, Japan.
6
Department of Microbiology and Infection, Faculty of Medicine, Kochi University, Kochi, Japan; Center for Innovative and Translational Medicine, Kochi University, Kochi, Japan. Electronic address: matuzaki@kochi-u.ac.jp.

Abstract

Nosocomial respiratory infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can progress to lethal systemic infections. Bacteriophage (phage) therapy is expected to be effective against these critical infections. Previously, phage S13' was proposed as a potential therapeutic phage. We here examined phage treatment in a mouse model of lung-derived septicemia using phage S13'. Intraperitoneal phage administration at 6 h postinfection reduced the severity of infection and rescued the infected mice. Phage S13' can efficiently lyse hospital-acquired MRSA strains causing pneumonia-associated bacteremia in vitro. Thus, phage therapy may be a possible therapeutic intervention in staphylococcal lung-derived septicemia.

KEYWORDS:

Bacteriophage; Mouse; Podoviridae; Therapeutic; Therapy

PMID:
24631574
DOI:
10.1016/j.micinf.2014.02.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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