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Physiol Behav. 2014 Apr 22;129:272-9. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.02.061. Epub 2014 Mar 11.

Central administration of oleate or octanoate activates hypothalamic fatty acid sensing and inhibits food intake in rainbow trout.

Author information

1
Laboratorio de Fisioloxía Animal, Departamento de Bioloxía Funcional e Ciencias da Saúde, Facultade de Bioloxía, Universidade de Vigo, 36310 Vigo, Spain.
2
Laboratorio de Fisioloxía Animal, Departamento de Bioloxía Funcional e Ciencias da Saúde, Facultade de Bioloxía, Universidade de Vigo, 36310 Vigo, Spain. Electronic address: jsoengas@uvigo.es.

Abstract

If levels of fatty acids like oleate and octanoate are directly sensed through different fatty acid (FA) sensing systems in hypothalamus of rainbow trout, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of FA should elicit effects similar to those previously observed after intraperitoneal (IP) treatment. Accordingly, we observed after ICV treatment with oleate or octanoate decreased food intake accompanied in hypothalamus by reduced potential of lipogenesis and FA oxidation, and decreased potential of ATP-dependent inward rectifier potassium channel (K(+)ATP). Those changes support direct FA sensing through mechanisms related to FA metabolism and mitochondrial activity. The FA sensing through binding to FAT/CD36 and subsequent expression of transcription factors appears to be also direct but an interaction with peripheral hormones cannot be rejected. Moreover, decreased expression of NPY and increased expression of POMC were observed in parallel with the activation of FA sensing systems and decreased food intake. These results allow us to suggest the involvement of at least these peptides in controlling the decreased food intake noted after oleate and octanoate treatment in rainbow trout.

KEYWORDS:

Fatty acid; Food intake; Hypothalamus; Intracerebroventricular; Rainbow trout

PMID:
24631300
DOI:
10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.02.061
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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