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Physiol Behav. 2014 Sep;136:145-54. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.03.002. Epub 2014 Mar 12.

Is fat taste ready for primetime?

Author information

1
Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, United States. Electronic address: ndipatri@uci.edu.

Abstract

Mounting evidence suggests that gustation is important for the orosensory detection of dietary fats, and might contribute to preferences that humans, rodents, and possibly other mammals exhibit for fat-rich foods. In contrast to sweet, sour, salty, bitter, and umami, fat is not widely recognized as a primary taste quality. Recent investigations, however, provide a wealth of information that is helping to elucidate the specific molecular, cellular, and neural mechanisms required for fat detection in mammals. The latest evidence supporting a fat taste will be explored in this review, with a particular focus on recent studies that suggest a surprising role for gut-brain endocannabinoid signaling in controlling intake and preference for fats based on their proposed taste properties.

KEYWORDS:

Endocannabinoid; Fat; Food reward; Periphery; Taste

PMID:
24631296
PMCID:
PMC4162865
DOI:
10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.03.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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