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Womens Health Issues. 2014 Mar-Apr;24(2):e211-8. doi: 10.1016/j.whi.2014.01.003.

Out-of-pocket costs and insurance coverage for abortion in the United States.

Author information

1
Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health (ANSIRH), University of California, San Francisco, Oakland, California. Electronic address: robertss@obgyn.ucsf.edu.
2
Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health (ANSIRH), University of California, San Francisco, Oakland, California.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Since 1976, federal Medicaid has excluded abortion care except in a small number of circumstances; 17 states provide this coverage using state Medicaid dollars. Since 2010, federal and state restrictions on insurance coverage for abortion have increased. This paper describes payment for abortion care before new restrictions among a sample of women receiving first and second trimester abortions.

METHODS:

Data are from the Turnaway Study, a study of women seeking abortion care at 30 facilities across the United States.

FINDINGS:

Two thirds received financial assistance, with those with pregnancies at later gestations more likely to receive assistance. Seven percent received funding from private insurance, 34% state Medicaid, and 29% other organizations. Median out-of-pocket costs when private insurance or Medicaid paid were $18 and $0. Median out-of-pocket cost for women for whom insurance or Medicaid did not pay was $575. For more than half, out-of-pocket costs were equivalent to more than one-third of monthly personal income; this was closer to two thirds among those receiving later abortions. One quarter who had private insurance had their abortion covered through insurance. Among women possibly eligible for Medicaid based on income and residence, more than one third received Medicaid coverage for the abortion. More than half reported cost as a reason for delay in obtaining an abortion. In a multivariate analysis, living in a state where Medicaid for abortion was available, having Medicaid or private insurance, being at a lower gestational age, and higher income were associated with lower odds of reporting cost as a reason for delay.

CONCLUSIONS:

Out-of-pocket costs for abortion care are substantial for many women, especially at later gestations. There are significant gaps in public and private insurance coverage for abortion.

PMID:
24630423
DOI:
10.1016/j.whi.2014.01.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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