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J Pediatr. 2014 Jun;164(6):1333-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.01.053. Epub 2014 Mar 12.

Effects of prenatal methamphetamine exposure on behavioral and cognitive findings at 7.5 years of age.

Author information

1
LA Biomed Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA.
2
LA Biomed Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA. Electronic address: smith@labiomed.org.
3
Brown Center for the Study of Children at Risk, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Women and Infants Hospital, Providence, RI.
4
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
5
Department of Psychology, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK.
6
Blank Hospital Regional Child Protection Center-Iowa Health, Des Moines, IA.
7
Center on Young Adult Health and Development, University of Maryland, School of Public Health, College Park, MD.
8
Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD.
9
John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine child behavioral and cognitive outcomes after prenatal exposure to methamphetamine.

STUDY DESIGN:

We enrolled 412 mother-infant pairs (204 methamphetamine-exposed and 208 unexposed matched comparisons) in the Infant Development, Environment, and Lifestyle study. The 151 children exposed to methamphetamine and 147 comparisons who attended the 7.5-year visit were included. Exposure was determined by maternal self-report and/or positive meconium toxicology. Maternal interviews assessed behavioral and cognitive outcomes using the Conners' Parent Rating Scale-Revised: Short Form.

RESULTS:

After adjusting for covariates, children exposed to methamphetamine had significantly higher cognitive problems subscale scores than comparisons and were 2.8 times more likely to have cognitive problems scores that were above average on the Conners' Parent Rating Scale-Revised: Short Form. No association between prenatal methamphetamine exposure and behavioral problems, measured by the oppositional, hyperactivity, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder index subscales, were found.

CONCLUSIONS:

Prenatal methamphetamine exposure was associated with increased cognitive problems, which may affect academic achievement and lead to increased negative behavioral outcomes.

PMID:
24630350
PMCID:
PMC4035384
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.01.053
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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