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Schizophr Res. 2014 Apr;154(1-3):89-92. doi: 10.1016/j.schres.2014.02.013. Epub 2014 Mar 11.

Abbreviated quality of life scales for schizophrenia: comparison and utility of two brief community functioning measures.

Author information

1
Schizophrenia Division, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada; Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. Electronic address: gagan.fervaha@utoronto.ca.
2
Schizophrenia Division, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada; Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
3
Schizophrenia Division, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada; Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The Heinrichs-Carpenter Quality of Life Scale (QLS) is the most extensively used real-world community functioning scale in schizophrenia research. However, the extensive time required to administer it and the inclusion of items that overlap conceptually with negative symptoms limit its use across studies. The present study examined the validity and utility of two abbreviated QLS measures against the full QLS excluding negative symptom items.

METHOD:

The sample included 1427 patients with schizophrenia who completed the baseline visit in the CATIE study. The validity of two abbreviated QLS measures (7-item and 4-item) were examined with the full QLS, excluding the intrapsychic foundations subscale, using correlation analysis. The utility of the abbreviated measures was explored by examining associations between the functioning scales and clinical variables and longitudinal change.

RESULTS:

Both abbreviated QLS measures were highly predictive of the full QLS (both r=0.91, p<0.001), with no difference in predictive value between the abridged measures. Functional status was significantly associated with symptoms and cognition. Importantly, the strength of these associations was similar between the abbreviated and full QLS. Finally, multiple regression models examining the explanatory power of amotivation/apathy in predicting functioning scores after other symptoms and neurocognition had been accounted for were essentially identical irrespective of the QLS instrument used as the dependent measure. Longitudinal change was also similar across the three scales.

CONCLUSIONS:

The 7-item abbreviated QLS is recommended as a brief measure of community functioning for individuals with schizophrenia, especially when assessment of functional outcome is not the focus.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00014001.

KEYWORDS:

Abbreviated Quality of Life Scale; Avolition-Apathy; Clinical assessment tool; Functional outcome; Psychosocial functioning; Schizophrenia

PMID:
24630140
DOI:
10.1016/j.schres.2014.02.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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