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Vet Microbiol. 2014 Jul 16;171(3-4):290-7. doi: 10.1016/j.vetmic.2014.02.001. Epub 2014 Feb 15.

An emerging public health problem: acquired carbapenemase-producing microorganisms are present in food-producing animals, their environment, companion animals and wild birds.

Author information

1
Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Department of Biological Safety, Max-Dohrn Strasse 8-10, D-10589 Berlin, Germany. Electronic address: beatriz.guerra@bfr.bund.de.
2
Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Department of Biological Safety, Max-Dohrn Strasse 8-10, D-10589 Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

Worldwide, the emergence and global spread of microorganisms with acquired carbapenemases is of great concern. The reservoirs for such organisms are increasing, not only in hospitals, but also in the community and environment. A new and important development is the presence of such organisms in livestock, companion animals and wildlife. During the last three years, carbapenemase-producing Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. (VIM-1 producers) and Acinetobacter spp. (producing OXA-23 and NDM-1) in livestock animals (poultry, cattle and swine) and their environment have been reported. In addition, the isolation of NDM-1-producing E. coli, OXA-48 in E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae or OXA-23 in Acinetobacter spp. from companion animals (cats, dogs or horses) has also been observed. Other reports have described the presence of NDM-1-producing Salmonella isolated from wild birds, as well as OXA-23-like-producing Acinetobacter baumannii in ectoparasites. However, until now carbapenemase producers from foods have not been detected. For humans in contrast carbapenem-producing Salmonella isolates are increasingly reported. The real prevalence of carbapenemase-encoding genes in zoonotic bacteria or commensals from animals is unknown. Consequently, there is a need for intensified surveillance on the occurrence of carbapenemase-producing bacteria in the food chain and other animal sources in order to assist in the formulation of measures to prevent their potential spread.

KEYWORDS:

Antimicrobial resistance; Carbapenems; Food; Livestock; Plasmids

PMID:
24629777
DOI:
10.1016/j.vetmic.2014.02.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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