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Arch Bronconeumol. 2014 Sep;50(9):375-8. doi: 10.1016/j.arbres.2014.01.017. Epub 2014 Mar 12.

Antibiotics in respiratory tract infections in hospital pediatric emergency departments.

[Article in English, Spanish]

Author information

  • 1Pediatría, CAP Ciutat Vella, Institut Català de la Salut, Barcelona, España; Departamentos de Pediatría, Obstetricia y Ginecología, y Medicina Preventiva, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, España.
  • 2Servicio de Pediatría, Hospital Infantil Universitario Niño Jesús, Madrid, España.
  • 3Unitat de Recerca Infancia i Entorn (URIE), Institut Hospital del Mar d'Investigacions Mèdiques (IMIM), Barcelona, España; Red SAMID, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, España.
  • 4Departamentos de Pediatría, Obstetricia y Ginecología, y Medicina Preventiva, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, España; Servicio de Pediatría, Hospital Infantil Universitario Niño Jesús, Madrid, España; Unitat de Recerca Infancia i Entorn (URIE), Institut Hospital del Mar d'Investigacions Mèdiques (IMIM), Barcelona, España; Red SAMID, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, España.
  • 5Departamentos de Pediatría, Obstetricia y Ginecología, y Medicina Preventiva, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, España; Servicio de Pediatría, Hospital Infantil Universitario Niño Jesús, Madrid, España; Unitat de Recerca Infancia i Entorn (URIE), Institut Hospital del Mar d'Investigacions Mèdiques (IMIM), Barcelona, España; Red SAMID, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, España. Electronic address: 90458@parcdesalutmar.cat.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Respiratory tract infections are one of the most frequent problems in pediatric clinics and generate an elevated prescription of antibiotics. The aim of this study was to find out the standard of care practice about antibiotic use in these infections in a pediatric emergency department and to evaluate compliance with clinical guidelines.

METHODS:

A pediatric emergency department database was reviewed from July 2005 to October 2007 under the category "respiratory infection", including variables such as age, antibiotic prescription and compliance with current clinical recommendations.

RESULTS:

Out of the 23,114 reviewed reports, 32.7% (7,567) were upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) (cold, acute otitis media [AOM], sinusitis and tonsillopharyngitis) or lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) (laryngitis, bronchitis, bronchiolitis and pneumonia). Children under the age of 2 were the most represented age group. Amongst URTI, rhinopharyngitis was the most frequent infection, while bronchitis was the most frequent among LRTI. Antibiotic therapy (mainly amoxicillin) was prescribed in 30.8% of URTI (5.7% rhinopharyngitis, 96.5% AOM, and 36.7% tonsillopharyngitis) and in 12.4% of LRTI.

CONCLUSIONS:

The percentage of respiratory tract infections was similar to previous studies and the antibiotic prescriptions followed current guidelines, except for cases diagnosed with AOM. Prescription compliance and clinical course of the cases should be monitored.

KEYWORDS:

Antibiotics; Antibióticos; Emergency room; Infecciones respiratorias de vías altas; Infecciones respiratorias de vías bajas; Lower respiratory tract infections; Pediatrics; Pediatría; Prescripción; Prescription; Servicios médicos de urgencias; Upper respiratory tract infections

PMID:
24629757
DOI:
10.1016/j.arbres.2014.01.017
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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