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Am J Health Behav. 2014 Mar;38(2):297-306. doi: 10.5993/AJHB.38.2.15.

Daily hassles' role in health seeking behavior among low-income populations.

Author information

1
Washington University in Saint Louis, School of Medicine, Division of Public Health Sciences, St Louis, MO, USA. jamesai@wudosis.wustl.edu.
2
Saint Louis University, College of Public Health & Social Justice, Department of Epidemiology, Kansas City, KS, USA.
3
Washington University in Saint Louis, School of Medicine, Division of Public Health Sciences, St Louis, MO, USA.
4
University of Kansas Medical Center, Department of Family Medicine, Kansas City, KS, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To adapt a daily hassles measure for a low-income population and assess the relationship between hassles and health seeking behavior.

METHODS:

The mixed methods approach used cognitive interviews (N = 23) to inform an adapted measure of daily hassles. The adapted scale was then tested via surveys (N = 144) in community health centers; multivariate logistic regression models were used to assess relationships among variables.

RESULTS:

Hassle concerning having enough money for emergencies (76.5%) and worrying about personal health (68.8%) were among the most common. Increased health-related hassles were associated with an increased likelihood to delay needed care.

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings suggest daily hassles are unique among low-income populations and should be considered in health behavior interventions.

PMID:
24629558
PMCID:
PMC4128832
DOI:
10.5993/AJHB.38.2.15
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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