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Res Dev Disabil. 2014 May;35(5):973-81. doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2014.02.009. Epub 2014 Mar 12.

Accelerometer use during field-based physical activity research in children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities: a systematic review.

Author information

1
Institute of Health and Wellbeing, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom.
2
School of Life Sciences, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom.
3
Institute of Health and Wellbeing, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Craig.Melville@glasgow.ac.uk.

Abstract

Many methodological questions and issues surround the use of accelerometers as a measure of physical activity during field-based research. To ensure overall research quality and the accuracy of results, methodological decisions should be based on study research questions. This paper aims to systematically review accelerometer use during field-based research in children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities. Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Knowledge, PsycINFO, PubMed, and a thesis database (up to May 2013) were searched to identify relevant articles. Articles which used accelerometry-based monitors, quantified activity levels, and included ambulatory children and adolescents (≤ 18 years) with intellectual disabilities were included. Based on best practice guidelines, a form was developed to extract data based on 17 research components of accelerometer use. The search identified 429 articles. Ten full-text articles met the criteria and were included in the review. Many shortcomings in accelerometer use were identified, with the percentage of review criteria met ranging from 12% to 47%. Various methods of accelerometer use were reported, with most use decisions not based on population-specific research. However, a lack of measurement research, e.g., calibration/validation, for children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities is limiting the ability of field-based researchers to make to the most appropriate accelerometer use decisions. The methods of accelerometer use employed can have significant effects on the quality and validity of results produced, which researchers should be more aware of. To allow informed use decisions, there should be a greater focus on measurement research related to children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities.

KEYWORDS:

Accelerometers; Intellectual disabilities; Physical activity

PMID:
24629542
DOI:
10.1016/j.ridd.2014.02.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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