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Am J Addict. 2014 Sep-Oct;23(5):485-92. doi: 10.1111/j.1521-0391.2014.12135.x. Epub 2014 Mar 15.

Physical activity and cannabis cessation.

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1
Department of Psychology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Based on recent empirical and theoretical work suggesting that physical activity (PA) activates many of the same physiological systems as cannabis, the present study sought to investigate the impact of PA level (ie, low [including none] vs. moderate/high) on a cannabis cessation attempt during the first 7 days post-quit.

METHODS:

The present study was a 2 time-point prospective study of 84 cannabis dependent military veterans (3 female) who responded to study flyers, within a Veterans Affairs Medical Center, seeking individuals interested in engaging in a self-guided cessation attempt. All study measures were self-report.

RESULTS:

Though no baseline differences between those with low and those with moderate/high levels of physical activity were observed, results revealed that participants who reported low levels of physical activity, versus moderate/high levels, were significantly more likely to report a cannabis lapse during the week following a quit attempt, particularly within the first 4 days of the cessation period. Further, individuals with low levels of PA were also more likely to report greater mean cannabis use during the first 4 days of the cessation period.

CONCLUSIONS AND SCIENTIFIC SIGNIFICANCE:

Findings suggest that early interventions aimed at increasing physical activity may be useful among individuals with cannabis dependence who are engaged in a cessation attempt.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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