Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clinics (Sao Paulo). 2014 Mar;69(3):203-11. doi: 10.6061/clinics/2014(03)11.

Runners in their forties dominate ultra-marathons from 50 to 3,100 miles.

Author information

1
University of Zurich, Institute of General Practice and for Health Services Research, Zurich, Switzerland, University of Zurich, Institute of General Practice and for Health Services Research, Zurich, Switzerland.
2
Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Burgundy, INSERM U1093, Dijon, France, University of Burgundy, Faculty of Sport Sciences, INSERM U1093, Dijon, France.
3
Gesundheitszentrum St. Gallen, St. Gallen, Switzerland, Gesundheitszentrum St. Gallen, St. Gallen, Switzerland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study investigated performance trends and the age of peak running speed in ultra-marathons from 50 to 3,100 miles.

METHODS:

The running speed and age of the fastest competitors in 50-, 100-, 200-, 1,000- and 3,100-mile events held worldwide from 1971 to 2012 were analyzed using single- and multi-level regression analyses.

RESULTS:

The number of events and competitors increased exponentially in 50- and 100-mile events. For the annual fastest runners, women improved in 50-mile events, but not men. In 100-mile events, both women and men improved their performance. In 1,000-mile events, men became slower. For the annual top ten runners, women improved in 50- and 100-mile events, whereas the performance of men remained unchanged in 50- and 3,100-mile events but improved in 100-mile events. The age of the annual fastest runners was approximately 35 years for both women and men in 50-mile events and approximately 35 years for women in 100-mile events. For men, the age of the annual fastest runners in 100-mile events was higher at 38 years. For the annual fastest runners of 1,000-mile events, the women were approximately 43 years of age, whereas for men, the age increased to 48 years of age. For the annual fastest runners of 3,100-mile events, the age in women decreased to 35 years and was approximately 39 years in men.

CONCLUSION:

The running speed of the fastest competitors increased for both women and men in 100-mile events but only for women in 50-mile events. The age of peak running speed increased in men with increasing race distance to approximately 45 years in 1,000-mile events, whereas it decreased to approximately 39 years in 3,100-mile events. In women, the upper age of peak running speed increased to approximately 51 years in 3,100-mile events.

PMID:
24626948
PMCID:
PMC3935130
DOI:
10.6061/clinics/2014(03)11
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Scientific Electronic Library Online Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center