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J Nutr Health Aging. 2014 Mar;18(3):228-33. doi: 10.1007/s12603-014-0004-8.

Sexually dimorphic patterns of nutritional intake and eating behaviors in community-dwelling older adults with normal and slow gait speed.

Author information

1
Debra L. Waters, University of New Mexico, School of Medicine, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131, New Mexico VA Health Care System, Section of Geriatrics, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108, University of Otago, Dunedin School of Medicine, Dunedin, New Zealand 9054, debra.waters@va.gov or debra.waters@otago.ac.nz.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Assess sex-specific nutritional intake and dietary habits of independently living older adults with normal and slow gait speeds.

DESIGN:

New Mexico Aging Process Study, cross-sectional, secondary data analysis.

SETTING:

Albuquerque, New Mexico USA.

PARTICIPANTS:

Three-hundred fifteen adults 60 years and older (194 women and 121 men).

MEASUREMENTS:

Gait speed test, 3-day diet records, Mini-Mental State Examination, and body mass index.

RESULTS:

Slow gait speed was associated with lower total calories (-154 kcal/day) and zinc (1 mg/day) (.05 < p < .1). Slower men consumed less protein (-4.1 g/day), calcium (-140 mg), fiber (-2.8 g/day) and iron (-2.5 mg/day) (p≤.05). Slower women consumed less, protein (-5.5 g/day), carbohydrate (-19.1 g/day), fiber (-2.7 gm/day), vitamin C (-18.4 mg/day) and higher fat intake (p=0.03). Slower women snacked less, had trouble chewing/biting, and lived alone (p= .04). Slower men were less likely to snack.

CONCLUSIONS:

We found sex-specific nutritional differences associated with gait speed. Those presenting with slow gait speed may need encouragement to increase meat and whole grain breads/cereal. Those with trouble eating should be advised on adapting diet to maintain adequate nutrition and encouraged on regular snacking to achieve higher nutrient intake. Prospective and randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm these findings and provide further evidence for putting these suggestions into practice.

PMID:
24626748
DOI:
10.1007/s12603-014-0004-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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