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PLoS One. 2014 Mar 13;9(3):e90548. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0090548. eCollection 2014.

Epidemiology of undiagnosed trichomoniasis in a probability sample of urban young adults.

Author information

1
Statistics and Epidemiology, Research Triangle Institute, Washington, District of Columbia, United States of America.
2
Statistics and Epidemiology, Research Triangle Institute, Washington, District of Columbia, United States of America; Program in Data Analytics and Applied Social Research, City University of New York (Queens College and the Graduate Center), Flushing, New York, United States of America.
3
School of Medicine and Gillings School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America.
4
Center for Survey Research, University of Massachusetts, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
5
Statistics and Epidemiology, Research Triangle Institute, Washington, District of Columbia, United States of America; Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
6
Research Computing Division, Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, United States of America.
7
Statistics and Epidemiology Division, Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, United States of America.
8
Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.

Abstract

T. vaginalis infection (trichomoniasis) is the most common curable sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the U.S. It is associated with increased HIV risk and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Trichomoniasis surveillance data do not exist for either national or local populations. The Monitoring STIs Survey Program (MSSP) collected survey data and specimens which were tested using nucleic acid amplification tests to monitor trichomoniasis and other STIs in 2006-09 among a probability sample of young adults (N = 2,936) in Baltimore, Maryland--an urban area with high rates of reported STIs. The estimated prevalence of trichomoniasis was 7.5% (95% CI 6.3, 9.1) in the overall population and 16.1% (95% CI 13.0, 19.8) among Black women. The overwhelming majority of infected men (98.5%) and women (73.3%) were asymptomatic. Infections were more common in both women (OR = 3.6, 95% CI 1.6, 8.2) and men (OR = 9.0, 95% CI 1.8, 44.3) with concurrent chlamydial infection. Trichomoniasis did not vary significantly by age for either men or women. Women with two or more partners in the past year and women with a history of personal or partner incarceration were more likely to have an infection. Overall, these results suggest that routine T vaginalis screening in populations at elevated risk of infection should be considered.

PMID:
24626058
PMCID:
PMC3953116
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0090548
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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