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Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2014 May;15(4):e168-74. doi: 10.1097/PCC.0000000000000100.

Does teaching crisis resource management skills improve resuscitation performance in pediatric residents?*.

Author information

1
1Division of Critical Care, Department of Pediatrics, Alberta Children's Hospital, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. 2Division of Critical Care, Department of Pediatrics, Stollery Children's Hospital, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. 3Departments of Pediatrics and Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute for Maternal and Child Health, Calgary, AB, Canada. 4Division of Critical Care, University of Alberta Hospital, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. 5Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Stollery Children's Hospital, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The effect of teaching crisis resource management skills on the resuscitation performance of pediatric residents is unknown. The primary objective of this pilot study was to determine if teaching crisis resource management to residents leads to improved clinical and crisis resource management performance in simulated pediatric resuscitation scenarios.

DESIGN:

A prospective, randomized control pilot study.

SETTING:

Simulation facility at tertiary pediatric hospital.

SUBJECTS:

Junior pediatric residents.

INTERVENTIONS:

Junior pediatric residents were randomized to 1 hour of crisis resource management instruction or no additional training.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

Time to predetermined resuscitation tasks was noted in simulated resuscitation scenarios immediately after intervention and again 3 months post intervention. Crisis resource management skills were evaluated using the Ottawa Global Rating Scale. Fifteen junior residents participated in the study, of which seven in the intervention group. The intervention crisis resource management group placed monitor leads 24.6 seconds earlier (p = 0.02), placed an IV 47.1 seconds sooner (p = 0.04), called for help 50.4 seconds faster (p = 0.03), and checked for a pulse after noticing a rhythm change 84.9 seconds quicker (p = 0.01). There was no statistically significant difference in time to initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (p = 0.264). The intervention group had overall crisis resource management performance scores 1.15 points higher (Ottawa Global Rating Scale [out of 7]) (p = 0.02). Three months later, these differences between the groups persisted.

CONCLUSIONS:

A 1-hour crisis resource management teaching session improved time to critical initial steps of pediatric resuscitation and crisis resource management performance as measured by the Ottawa Global Rating Scale. The control group did not develop these crisis resource management skills over 3 months of standard training indicating that obtaining these skills requires specific education. Larger studies of crisis resource education are required.

PMID:
24622164
DOI:
10.1097/PCC.0000000000000100
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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