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Occup Ther Int. 2014 Sep;21(3):98-107. doi: 10.1002/oti.1368. Epub 2014 Mar 11.

Occupations that people with late effects of polio perceive difficult to perform.

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1
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.

Abstract

The aims of this study were to describe which occupations that people with late effects of polio perceive difficult to perform, which occupational area the occupations were related to and their level of complexity. The aims were also to describe their own perception of the importance, performance and satisfaction with these occupations. Sixty-two participants (mean age 61 years) were assessed with the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. A total of 431 occupations were reported (43% self-care, 32% productivity and 25% leisure). Two subcategories, household management (27 %) and functional mobility (23 %), represented half of all the reported occupations. Ratings for prioritized occupations (N = 300) were high for importance and generally low for performance and satisfaction. A wide variety of occupations were reported, related to both occupational areas and different levels of complexity within an occupational area. The results underscore the importance of using assessment tools that can capture both the variety and complexity of occupations. By obtaining more detailed information about occupations that people with late effects of polio perceive difficult to perform, this will enable occupational therapists to offer targeted interventions that can facilitate engagement in meaningful and purposeful occupations. A larger and more heterogeneous sample may enable the results to be generalized to more people with late effects of polio. Future studies should focus on methods that can facilitate engagement in meaningful and purposeful occupations for people with late effects of polio.

KEYWORDS:

COPM; activities of daily living; client-centred assessment; postpoliomyelitis syndrome; rehabilitation

PMID:
24619836
DOI:
10.1002/oti.1368
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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