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Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2014 Aug;33(8):858-64. doi: 10.1097/INF.0000000000000328.

Evolving role of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in clinical practice.

Author information

1
From the *Department of Paediatrics, University of Florence, Meyer Children's University-Hospital, Viale Pieraccini 24, Firenze, Italy; †Pediatric Department, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain, and Vaccine Research Unit, Healthcare Research Institute of Santiago, Spain; ‡Medical Department Group and Scientific Affairs, Pfizer Vaccines, Paris, France; and §Pediatric Infectious Disease Unit, Soroka University Medical Center, and the Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel.

Abstract

Since the introduction of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7), PCVs with extended coverage have become available, and there is emerging global evidence that these vaccines, in particular PCV13, have further reduced rates of invasive pneumococcal disease compared with PCV7. The present article aims to address emerging topics related to PCV13 use in routine clinical practice; specifically: (1) the potential role of high-valent PCVs in reducing pneumococcal disease burden; (2) the impact of PCVs on nasopharyngeal carriage and how this may contribute to reductions in otitis media and pneumonia, as well as the prevalence of resistant pneumococcal strains; (3) new PCV13 indications and (4) importance of schedule adherence for PCV in the prevention of cases of vaccine serotype-specific invasive pneumococcal disease. The beneficial effects of PCVs in protecting individuals from a wide spectrum of pneumococcal diseases can be increased by improving the vaccine coverage and adhering to the recommended vaccination schedules. There is increasing evidence that PCV13 has reduced much of the post-PCV7 burden of pneumococcal diseases in the pediatric community, including reducing pneumococcal colonization and the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease and mucosal diseases. This has also led to a reduction in antibiotic-resistant pneumococcal diseases. The role of PCV13 in clinical practice is evolving, with PCV13 now available for children and adolescents between the ages of 6 weeks and 17 years, thus ensuring that children in all age groups can be protected against vaccine-serotype pneumococcal diseases. Continued surveillance is warranted to monitor the impact of PCV13 on disease burden.

PMID:
24618937
DOI:
10.1097/INF.0000000000000328
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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