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Ann Oncol. 2014 Jun;25(6):1228-33. doi: 10.1093/annonc/mdu115. Epub 2014 Mar 11.

Association of vegetable and fruit intake with gastric cancer risk among Japanese: a pooled analysis of four cohort studies.

Author information

1
Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo tshimazu@ncc.go.jp.
2
Department of Preventive Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya.
3
Department of Public Health, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo.
4
Division of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Forensic Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai.
5
Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga.
6
Department of Preventive Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka.
7
Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu.
8
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Clinical Research Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo.
9
Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
10
Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Prospective evidence is inconsistent regarding the association between vegetable/fruit intake and the risk of gastric cancer.

METHODS:

In an analysis of original data from four population-based prospective cohort studies encompassing 191 232 participants, we used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of gastric cancer incidence according to vegetable and fruit intake and conducted a meta-analysis of HRs derived from each study.

RESULTS:

During 2 094 428 person-years of follow-up, 2995 gastric cancer cases were identified. After adjustment for potential confounders, we found a marginally significant decrease in gastric cancer risk in relation to total vegetable intake but not total fruit intake: the multivariate-adjusted HR (95% CI; P for trend) for the highest versus the lowest quintile of total vegetable intake was 0.89 (0.77-1.03; P for trend = 0.13) among men and 0.83 (0.67-1.03; P for trend = 0.40) among women. For distal gastric cancer, the multivariate HR for the highest quintile of total vegetable intake was 0.78 (0.63-0.97; P for trend = 0.02) among men.

CONCLUSIONS:

This pooled analysis of data from large prospective studies in Japan suggests that vegetable intake reduces gastric cancer risk, especially the risk of distal gastric cancer among men.

KEYWORDS:

epidemiology; fruit; pooled analysis; prospective studies; stomach neoplasms; vegetables

PMID:
24618149
DOI:
10.1093/annonc/mdu115
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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